TWA to organize Crucial Panel Discussion on India-China-Tibet relations on the eve of Chinese President Hu Jintao’s India visit

TWA to hold a CRUCIAL PANEL DISCUSSION – An Academic Dialogue: What Does the Tibetan Leverage Mean for India Today?

In preparation for Chinese President Hu Jintao’s crucial visit to New Delhi, the Tibetan Women’s Association is hosting an “Academic Dialogue” to present imperative viewpoints to decision-makers and the public. The three-hour discussion (3 pm to 6 pm, including hi-tea) will occur on Tuesday, March 27, 2012 at Casuarina hall, Gate number 3, at the India Habitat Centre, New Delhi.

The honorable speakers are:
-Alka Acharya, Associate Professor, JNU and member, National Security Advisory Board of the Government of India.

-Tempa Tsering, Special Representative, Delhi Bureau Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama


-Mohan Guruswamy, Chairman and Founder of Centre for Policy Alternatives


-Vinod Saighal, former Major General, Writer and Executive Director of Eco Monitors Society

-Tenzin Tsundue, Writer and Activist

The discussion will be moderated by Rogan Motis, International Affairs and Environmental Issues analyst.

contact Dhardon Sharling for further updates and to request an invitation:
twaeventsandcampaigns@gmail.com
mobile # 0-9418791189

Crucial Panel Discussion

________________________CONCEPT NOTE_________________

An Academic Dialogue: What Does the Tibetan Leverage Mean for India Today?

Sponsored by The Central Tibetan Women’s Association

March 27, 2012

Casuraina Hall, India Habitat Center

In the wake of heightening Tibetan resistance and desperation, intensifying Chinese military response, and Asia’s looming water crisis threatening the future of regional stability, there is no doubt that the global eye has shifted east.

Static Sino-Tibetan dialogue has exacerbated the baleful potential of such issues, jeopardizing the balance of peace and stability for the entire region, and arguably the world. Given that Asia has not developed mechanisms to collectively address security issues of such magnitude, the potential to avoid chaos is dwindling. As a result, destructive forms of competition, manipulation, and violence reign unchecked and the benefits of seeking long-term stability through compromise remain muted.

Growing miscommunication among frustrated parties has provoked louder actions and reactions in the name of a common goal: stability. Because means to such an end vary, constructive dialogue reflecting a united Asian effort must ensue. Namely, Indian-Sino-Tibetan relations must reclaim the political table, and with creative, future-oriented zeal.

On one hand, Indian hospitality toward the Central Tibetan Administration and Tibetan refugees has provided India with useful leverage against Chinese intimidation. Tibetan-Chinese relations blemish the Chinese reputation among world powers, particularly in the west, and control of such damage lies notably in Indian hands. India also maintains a distinct influence on Tibetan affairs as home to over 120,000 Tibetans and the CTA, lending India a prominent voice regarding vital neighborly security issues.

On the other hand, Chinese security gains are mounting. Chinese aspirations to dam the Brahmaputra River threaten countless lives in India and other Asian countries including Bangladesh, Nepal, Laos, Burma, and Pakistan. Environmental recklessness has brought deadly floods to Arunachal Pradesh, among other locations, whose shared border with Tibet has transformed into one of the top militarized zones on Earth. In the coming decades, scientists predict that water and resulting food shortages have the potential to affect millions, and India, home to one-sixth of the planet’s population, will bear the brunt of such devastation.

Numerous strategic advantages play into India’s enduring choice to host Tibetans, but are they being utilized? As patience continues to wane and the threats to Indian security mature, how should India’s stake in Sino-Tibetan relations adapt?


In preparation for Chinese President Hu Jintao’s crucial visit to New Delhi, the Tibetan Women’s Association is hosting an “Academic Dialogue” to present imperative viewpoints to decision-makers and the public. This panel discussion will accommodate great thinkers who represent a variety of viewpoints regarding the topic of What does the Tibet Leverage Mean for India Today? The Tibetan Women’s Association is committed to the Middle Way Approach and believes that, thought-provoking discussion is an effective way to mark President Jintao’s visit to India and suggest the continuation of dialogues among government representatives.

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