March 27 India Tibet discussion

An Academic Dialogue: What Does the Tibet Leverage Mean for India Today?

TWA organizes a crucial Panel Discussion on the eve of Hu Jintao’s India visit

March 27 India Tibet discussionNew Delhi, March 27, 2012: In the wake of heightening Tibetan resistance and desperation, intensifying Chinese military response, and Asia’s looming water crisis threatening the future of regional stability, there is no doubt that the global eye has shifted east.

To view pictures of the event, please see the bottom of this page or visit TWA’s Flickr page here.

In preparation for Chinese President Hu Jintao’s visit to New Delhi tomorrow, the Tibetan Women’s Association (TWA) hosted an “Academic Dialogue” today to present imperative viewpoints to decision-makers and the public regarding Sino-Indian-Tibetan affairs. Four speakers debated “What the Tibetan Leverage Means for India Today,” and engaged in a question-and- answer session after their individual 15-minute statements.

The event, held at the Casuriana Hall of New Delhi’s India Habitat Center, commenced with a moment of silence to respect those who are contributing to the peaceful resolution for Tibet crisis – “Tibetan, Chinese, or other, alive or passed on.” Special recognition was made to yesterday’s self-immolation by Jamphel Yeshi (27) in New Delhi on March 26.

Following the introduction, four speakers offered insight into Sino-India-Tibet realities: Mr. Tempa Tsering, Special Representative for the Delhi Bureau Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama; Dr. Mohan Guruswamy, Chairman and Founder of the Centre for Policy Alternatives and author of ‘Chasing the Dragon: Will India Catch Up with China?’; Former Major General Vinod Saighal, internationally acclaimed political author and Executive Director of Eco Monitors Society (EMS); and Tenzin Tsundue, writer, 2001 winner of the Outlook-Picador Award for Non-Fiction, and renowned Tibetan activist.

March 27 India Tibet discussionTempa Tsering began the discussion with an overview of past and present Tibetan history, relating notable events to a declining trust among Asian neighbors today. Tsering highlighted sources of Tibetan inspiration for nonviolent resistance and insisted that military might is not a sole source of power. He called on other countries to represent their stated principles, and suggested that India can contribute to progress in Sino-Tibet affairs under the Middle Way Policy, a path continuously encouraged by His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Mohan Guruswamy followed Tsering with a compelling assessment of Indian and Chinese military positioning, the statehood of Tibet, and a review of the Indian policy of compassion toward troubled governments and citizens. “When the Tibetans threw out the Chinese in 1913, they came to India: we are a place of refuge. We are home to Afghans, Ugyurs, Burmese, Pakistanis, Tamils… it is the nature of India.” Dr. Guruswamy insisted that though Tibetan activities have a strong impact on the Indian community, India would not go to war over Tibetan issues—India can only continue to pressure for the resumption of dialogues.

Tenzin Tsundue started off by acknowledging United States and India’s inability to assist Tibet—country efforts that are thwarted by business interests. Tsundue recognized India’s particularly immense desire to lessen neighborly tensions and claimed that “India gives us [Tibetans] our strength, our confidence—India is our guru.” Tsundue pointed to Tibetan unity on the boycott of Losar in honor of self-immolations, defining the “Tibetan Leverage” to be the Tibetan freedom struggle itself. “If there is any leverage India seeks—it’s the Tibetan people—they make the Tibetan freedom struggle a threat to China.” He warned of an impending Chinese collapse that will drastically damage the western corporate investment that has propped China up. “We are already free and have nothing to lose aside from Chinese insecurity.” Tsundue asserted that if China has any fear, it is of the unity and the spiritual strength of the Tibetan people. He affirmed that ‘this is the leverage Tibetans have to offer.’

Major General Vinod Saighal contended that ‘dialogues’ are among equals, and the western recession has eliminated the ability of many governments continue respectable dialogue with China. “Money talks… the day that India can ‘talk’ will be the day India tells China to talk to a representative of His Holiness.” Until then, General Saighal suggested Tibetan nonviolence itself to be the ‘Tibetan Leverage,” as a force the world has never seen before.

An audience of students of various levels, news media, concerned citizens, and intellectuals responded to the statements with follow-up questions and requests for elaboration during the preliminary question an answer session, held before a break for hi-tea.

In response to a question requesting concrete examples of potential Indian action, Tempa Tsering claimed that India had already done everything within its political limitations, and Guruswamy agreed and said that ‘Freedom is something people must earn themselves.” Tenzin Tsundue pointed to the many political calculations that failed to predict the Arab Spring or the fall of the USSR—human efforts. He suggested that India recognize historical Tibetan independence in order to claim their right to Arunachal Pradesh under the bilateral treaty signed between Tibet and British India in 1914.

The panelists also responded to inquiries regarding foreign response to self-immolation and media coverage of Tibetan events. Guruswamy said that while India is ‘unhappy to see people immolating, it has a responsibility as a rising power.’ Tsundue asserted that ‘Tibetans will fight and win our freedom, but we will not kill ourselves – we may set ourselves on fire, but we will not hurt the other. This is our spirit’.

Upon breaking for hi-tea, approximately ten policemen in plain-clothes, led by the Deputy Commissioner of Police, ambushed Tenzin Tsundue while he was speaking with guests and “preventatively arrested” him around 5:30 p.m. TWA officials pleaded with the authorities to let Tsundue complete his commitment, but were met with violent shoves. Tsundue was dragged to his feet and forced out the back door, and his whereabouts remain unknown.

Tenzin Tsundue’s unexpected detainment proved a stark reminder of the reality –‘Tibet’s leverage’-that spawned today’s panel discussion.

TWA was founded in 1959 in Lhasa, Tibet, and is the second-largest Tibetan non-governmental organization in exile. TWA is committed to the Middle Way Policy seeking genuine autonomy within the framework of PRC, and believes that thought-provoking discussion is one of the effective ways to mark President Hu Jintao’s visit to India and suggest the continuation of dialogues among government representatives.

Press Contact:
Kirti Dolkar Lhamo, President, TWA: 0-9882291202
Dhardon Sharling, Communications officer, TWA: 0-9418791189

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Crucial Panel Discussion

TWA to organize Crucial Panel Discussion on India-China-Tibet relations on the eve of Chinese President Hu Jintao’s India visit

TWA to hold a CRUCIAL PANEL DISCUSSION – An Academic Dialogue: What Does the Tibetan Leverage Mean for India Today?

In preparation for Chinese President Hu Jintao’s crucial visit to New Delhi, the Tibetan Women’s Association is hosting an “Academic Dialogue” to present imperative viewpoints to decision-makers and the public. The three-hour discussion (3 pm to 6 pm, including hi-tea) will occur on Tuesday, March 27, 2012 at Casuarina hall, Gate number 3, at the India Habitat Centre, New Delhi.

The honorable speakers are:
-Alka Acharya, Associate Professor, JNU and member, National Security Advisory Board of the Government of India.

-Tempa Tsering, Special Representative, Delhi Bureau Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama


-Mohan Guruswamy, Chairman and Founder of Centre for Policy Alternatives


-Vinod Saighal, former Major General, Writer and Executive Director of Eco Monitors Society

-Tenzin Tsundue, Writer and Activist

The discussion will be moderated by Rogan Motis, International Affairs and Environmental Issues analyst.

contact Dhardon Sharling for further updates and to request an invitation:
twaeventsandcampaigns@gmail.com
mobile # 0-9418791189

Crucial Panel Discussion

________________________CONCEPT NOTE_________________

An Academic Dialogue: What Does the Tibetan Leverage Mean for India Today?

Sponsored by The Central Tibetan Women’s Association

March 27, 2012

Casuraina Hall, India Habitat Center

In the wake of heightening Tibetan resistance and desperation, intensifying Chinese military response, and Asia’s looming water crisis threatening the future of regional stability, there is no doubt that the global eye has shifted east.

Static Sino-Tibetan dialogue has exacerbated the baleful potential of such issues, jeopardizing the balance of peace and stability for the entire region, and arguably the world. Given that Asia has not developed mechanisms to collectively address security issues of such magnitude, the potential to avoid chaos is dwindling. As a result, destructive forms of competition, manipulation, and violence reign unchecked and the benefits of seeking long-term stability through compromise remain muted.

Growing miscommunication among frustrated parties has provoked louder actions and reactions in the name of a common goal: stability. Because means to such an end vary, constructive dialogue reflecting a united Asian effort must ensue. Namely, Indian-Sino-Tibetan relations must reclaim the political table, and with creative, future-oriented zeal.

On one hand, Indian hospitality toward the Central Tibetan Administration and Tibetan refugees has provided India with useful leverage against Chinese intimidation. Tibetan-Chinese relations blemish the Chinese reputation among world powers, particularly in the west, and control of such damage lies notably in Indian hands. India also maintains a distinct influence on Tibetan affairs as home to over 120,000 Tibetans and the CTA, lending India a prominent voice regarding vital neighborly security issues.

On the other hand, Chinese security gains are mounting. Chinese aspirations to dam the Brahmaputra River threaten countless lives in India and other Asian countries including Bangladesh, Nepal, Laos, Burma, and Pakistan. Environmental recklessness has brought deadly floods to Arunachal Pradesh, among other locations, whose shared border with Tibet has transformed into one of the top militarized zones on Earth. In the coming decades, scientists predict that water and resulting food shortages have the potential to affect millions, and India, home to one-sixth of the planet’s population, will bear the brunt of such devastation.

Numerous strategic advantages play into India’s enduring choice to host Tibetans, but are they being utilized? As patience continues to wane and the threats to Indian security mature, how should India’s stake in Sino-Tibetan relations adapt?


In preparation for Chinese President Hu Jintao’s crucial visit to New Delhi, the Tibetan Women’s Association is hosting an “Academic Dialogue” to present imperative viewpoints to decision-makers and the public. This panel discussion will accommodate great thinkers who represent a variety of viewpoints regarding the topic of What does the Tibet Leverage Mean for India Today? The Tibetan Women’s Association is committed to the Middle Way Approach and believes that, thought-provoking discussion is an effective way to mark President Jintao’s visit to India and suggest the continuation of dialogues among government representatives.

Women's leadership in the 21st century - poster

TWA to hold Women’s Leadership in the 21st Century panel discussion

A Symposium: ‘Women’s Leadership in the 21st century, a noble achievement’

Women's leadership in the 21st century - poster
Click to enlarge

Delhi, November 28: On the momentus occasion of South Asian Women’s Day, and as a culmination of the concluding session of the 2nd Advanced Tibetan Women’s Leadership Training, the Tibetan Women’s Association is organizing a 90 minute audience based discussion on the topic ‘Women’s Leadership in the 21st century, a Noble Achievement.’ This will take place on the final day of TWA’s Second Advanced Tibetan Women’s Leadership Training. Please view our website following the event for the report and pictures.

The 21st century saw the dawn of proven leadership by women and this has been reiterated with the recent announcement of three women leaders as winners of the Nobel peace prize 2011 for ‘their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work.’

Four prominent and distinguished personalities; Dr. Kiran Bedi, Social Activist and (Retd) Indian Police Officer, Youdon Aukatsang, Senior Member of the Tibetan Parliament in Exile, Jaya Jaitly, Activist and former Political leader, and Vinod Saighal, (Retd) Major General, will discuss ‘Women’s Leadership in the 21st century, a Noble Achievement’ and receive questions from the audience consisting of dignitaries, young Tibetan women leaders, professionals and members of the media.

The 90-minute discussion will be moderated by Dhardon Sharling, member of the Tibetan Parliament in Exile and Research and Communications officer of Tibetan Women’s Association

Time: 11:30 – 13:00
Day and Date: Wednesday, 30th November 2011
Venue: Seminar Hall Number 1, India International Center, Lodhi Road, New Delhi

Program Schedule 11:30 to 13:00

11.25: Speakers, guests, media and selected audience arrive at Seminar Hall number one, India International Center, Lodhi Road.

11:30: Moderator of the discussion invites the panelists on the dice

11:35: Dolkar Lhamo Kirti, President of Tibetan Women’s Association, gives the welcome message

11:40: Panelists will speak for 10 minute each

11:40 to 11:50 ; Dr. Kiran Bedi, Social Activist and (Retd) Indian Police Officer

11:50 to 12:00; Youdon Aukatsang, Member, Tibetan Parliament in Exile

12:00 to 12:10: Jaya Jaitly, Activist and former Political leader

12:10 to 12:20: Vinod Saighal, (Retd) Major General

12:20: Moderator will leave the floor open for a 30-minute Question and Answer session

12: 20 – 12:50: Audience will pose questions (pertaining to the assigned topic) to the panelists

12:50-12:55: Moderator will give the concluding note

12:55 – 13:00: Samten Choedon, Vice president of Tibetan Women’s Association will deliver the ‘thank you note’ while President, TWA will offer scarf and gifts to the panelists.

13:00 pm to 14:00 pm : Lunch at India International Center.
Our esteemed panelists are requested to join us for lunch at the Pre-meeting hall, which will be followed by a photo session.

Tibetan Women’s Association (TWA) is the second largest Tibetan Non Governmental Organization (NGO) based in exile India and the only Women’s NGO in Tibetan history. We are today a 16,000 member organization with 56 chapters in four continents; Asia, US. Europe and Australia. TWA’s slogan is ‘Advocacy for Home, Action in Exile.’